There’ll Be Some Changes Made

16 08 2012

There’ll Be Some Changes Made—B. Overstreet/B. Higgins, 1921 (Recorded July 19, 2012, re-mixed August 16) Here’s an old number I learned principally from listening to Mildred Bailey’s recording, but lots of other jazz people did it through the ages. Fats Waller’s and Ethel Waters’s versions are among my faves.

I know so many people these days who are going through rough times. This one is for all my friends out there who are looking for a little change of pace.





Solace, A Mexican Serenade

10 08 2012

Solace, A Mexican Serenade—Scott Joplin, 1909 (Recorded August 10, 2012) Here’s a quick, low-res cell phone video of me playing the Scott Joplin number that many of us will remember from the soundtrack for the film, “The Sting.” This recording is of the “C” and “D” parts of the entire composition; these later sections of the whole were used in the movie score.

For Marvin Hamlisch, in memoriam, June 2, 1944–August 6, 2012.





You Don’t Know Me

5 08 2012

You Don’t Know Me—C. Walker/E. Arnold, 1955 (Recorded August 5, 2012) I recorded this Eddy Arnold Country classic for the Ukulele Cosmos Monthly Invitational challenge. It’s a great lost-love ballad and has always been one of my very favorite tunes. Of course, Ray Charles’s version from 1962 is the most popular take on this tune, rising to #2 on the Billboard charts for that year. In my research, I was pleased to find out that Carmen McRae also cut this tune, in 1956. Anybody who knows me knows what a Carmen McRae nut I am; the song has taken on a new meaning for me now that I have heard it as stamped by one of the queens of jazz.





Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive

26 07 2012

Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive—H. Arlen/J. Mercer, 1944 (Recorded July 26, 2012) Wikipedia reports that Johnny Mercer came up with this lyric after attending a sermon by Father Divine, where “you got to accentuate the positive and eliminate the negative” is supposed to have been an actual quote by the (in)famous preacher.

The song was used in the Bing Crosby-Betty Hutton movie, Here Come the Waves. I yanked this arrangement by listening to the master himself, Johnny Mercer, in his recording with Paul Weston’s (aka Jonathan Edwards) band and the Pied Piper vocal group. I sang it through straight, playing the Glyph ukulele, and then added maracas and background vocals.

This song is dedicated to all my pals who, this very weekend, are attending the Hollesley Ukulele Festival, aka “Raystock,” over in Hollesley, Suffolk, England. Hope to see you guys there in 2013!





Last Night When We Were Young

10 07 2012

Last Night When We Were Young—H. Arlen/E.Y. Harburg, 1935 (Recorded July 10, 2012) Harold Arlen told Alec Wilder that he wrote this song expressly for opera singer/actor Lawrence Tibbett. Tibbett’s performance of the song was cut from the movie, Metropolitan, though, but the tune lived on in well-known pop versions by Sinatra and Judy Garland, among others.

I love the song, and tried my best to do it justice. Represented here is version 10 of my recorded efforts, so, yeah, I tried and tried! Since there is a loud vocal part toward the end, I kept getting the levels wrong, blowing out the recording during the lung-busting measure. This cut turned out ok, technically and performance-wise, although I still sing it better in the shower. ;°)





My Old Man

17 06 2012

My Old Man—B. Hanighen/J. Mercer, 1933 (Recorded June 17, 2012) It’s said that Johnny Mercer and Bernie Hanighen wrote this tune expressly for one of Johnny’s favorite acts of the day, the popular string-and-vocal band, the Spirits of Rhythm. In the spirit of Father’s Day, I dedicate this song to my old man, who died just a couple of days after his 60th birthday way back in September of 1982. Hope there’s barrels of whisky keeping you frisky wherever you are, you ol’ devil! (I don’t believe in an afterlife, but still.)





Like Someone in Love

15 06 2012

Like Someone in Love—J. Van Heusen/J. Burke, 1944 (Recorded June 15, 2012) I’ve been on a Jimmy Van Heusen kick lately. Edward Chester Babcock has long been in the Top Five of my favorite songwriters, along with Johnny Mercer, Harold Arlen, Hoagy Carmichael, and Cole Porter. (E. C. Babcock was Van Heusen’s birth name—he changed it at the insistence of a radio program manager who thought “Babcock” sounded, well, too “cocky.” As the story goes, Babcock looked out the window and, seeing a Van Heusen shirt truck driving by, changed his name on the spot.)

Back in the early 1990s, when I first heard the album, Rosemary Clooney Sings the Music of Jimmy Van Heusen, I was hooked. An inventive songster, Van Heusen is most closely associated in his early career with Bing Crosby and later on with Sinatra. I was prompted to record these numbers because I’ve been reading the engrossing book, “The House that George Built” by Wilfrid Sheed, and I’ve just finished the chapter about Van Heusen. What a character, that Jimmy! Read Sheed’s book if you have any interest in these song standards. It’s excellent.